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06.12.2019 Source: AWEX
AWEX EMI 1492
Micron 17 1914 -54
Micron 18 1798 -51
Micron 19 1712 -31
Micron 20 1674 -26
Micron 21 1671 -29
Micron 22 1664n -70
Micron 26 1133n -28
Micron 28 835 -10
Micron 30 684n -10
Micron 32 435n -25
MCar 1077 -2
Regenerative Techniques and Benefits
Many farmers have laudably undertaken natural resource management initiatives on their properties to make their landscapes more sustainable and there are a growing number of farmers who have gone one step further and embraced regenerative agriculture.

Regenerative agriculture is a system of farming which actively regenerates, rather than degrades or maintains, the current natural resource base. 

Improving soil health is a key priority. Strong, healthy soils (structural and biological) with deep carbon levels retain water, support strong, nutrient rich plants, and promote biodiversity in soil microbes and plants. They also sequester greater amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, which helps combat climate change.

Regenerative agriculture works to:


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support soil systems

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increases biodiversity
encourage and support flora and fauna species co-habitation
 

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improve water cycles
repair erosion and reduce and remove water pollution

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support bio-sequestration
increase dry matter compost and soil structure to lock carbon back into soil
 

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increase resilience to climate fluctuation
build resilience through ground cover and water storage
 

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strengthen soil health and vitality
improve water retention, compost and pastures and tree root systems

 

Graziers with better profitability, biodiversity and wellbeing

This survey, conducted by Vanguard Business Services, has found that regenerative graziers are often more profitable and have significantly higher than average wellbeing compared with other NSW farmers. These findings verify the claim that regenerative graziers are able to be profitable whilst maintaining and enhancing the biodiversity on their properties.

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Regenerative agriculture techniques generally focus on integrated management of soil, water, vegetation and biodiversity.

IMPLEMENTING TIME- CONTROLLED PLANNED GRAZING

By dividing a property into smaller paddocks and rotationally grazing them, the short duration of grazing combined with a longer planned plant recovery period reduces overgrazing of the desirable species. The higher stock density can result in a more even grazing over each paddock. Intestinal parasite cycles can be broken by rotational grazing.

SLOWING THE FLOW OF WATER ON THE PROPERTY

Constructing interventions in the landscape or waterways, such as ‘leaky weirs’, slows down the rate of runoff, especially after rain. This allows time for water to percolate into the soil layers and rehydrate the landscape. Also, sediment is deposited, gradually rebuilding eroded creek beds.

LIFTING AND MAINTAINING GROUND COVER

Good ground cover improves the water cycle of the land so that when it gets rain there’s very little run off. It also helps prevent moisture evaporation, further extending the growing season. Permanent ground cover also protects the soils from wind and water erosion, while providing organic matter for the soil.

ANIMAL IMPACT AND AVOIDING OVERSTOCKING

Rather than dictating to the land what stock it has to carry, it is better to look after the land, evaluate what it has to offer and then attempt to stock it accordingly. Leaving enough grass in the paddock and maintaining living roots enable the pasture to recover quickly. Living roots feed soil biology. The planned approach to grazing also allows for timely feed budgeting.

ENCOURAGING PERENNIAL NATIVE GRASSLANDS

Native grassland has diverse species (some have shallow roots, some deep etc), with each playing a role in maintaining soil health. They have evolved to suit the soils and climate and are adept at surviving droughts and heavy rains. They also help crowd out weeds. Many of the native perennials can have high feed quality.

REDUCING CHEMICAL INPUTS

As well as being costly, synthetic fertilisers can have negative impacts on the natural biological life in the soil. Applying organic composts, fertilisers and bio-amendments can be a cost efficient and effective management practise to improve soil health. Promoting biological activity of soils reduces the reliance on chemical inputs.

AVOIDING TILLAGE OF SOIL

As well as limiting chemical disturbance of the soil, limiting mechanical and physical disturbance of the soil helps improve the structure of the soil, including the aggregates and soil pores that allow water to infiltrate into the soil. Tillage can result in soil erosion.

UTILISING LIVESTOCK AS A FARM TOOL

Stock can be used, in effect, as the farm machinery such as to transfer nutrients off sheep camps, move seed through the farm and reduce weeds and intestinal worm infection. Stock density, the herd effect, and planned rest from grazing are as much tools as is a plough.

PASTURE CROPPING

Pasture cropping involves sowing crops into living perennial pastures and growing them in combination, so that the cropping and grazing benefit each other. No ground cover vegetation is killed prior to sowing and no tilling occurs, which improves soil structure and fertility.

REVEGETATING THE LANDSCAPE

Supporting a diversity of vegetation, including trees, helps to moderate temperatures, provides habitat and shelter, builds resilience in the landscape (especially to climate extremes) so it is able to recover more quickly, and contributes to the long-term productivity of the land.

MANAGING WATERWAYS

Degraded waterways and banks can be improved by fencing off stock and implementing water reticulation for stock, alongside the establishment of a vegetated strip at least 10 metres wide with a mix of native trees, shrubs and grass. These can be appropriately grazed.

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Legumes
Legume pastures are a high quality source of animal feed that are palatable, highly digestible and high in protein. Read more
Grasses
AWI invests in pasture breeding, selection and commercialisation to make available to woolgrowers a suite of high performance pasture legumes and grasses that support profitable, sustainable wool production. Read more
Weed and Pest Management
Insect pest damage and competition for space and nutrients from weeds can significantly reduce the productivity and persistence of Australian pasture Read more